Blog

By Jennifer Gioia, Communications Manager at Child Care Services Association

Every year on November 20, since 1954, the world celebrates Universal Children’s Day to spread awareness of improving child welfare worldwide, promoting and celebrating children’s rights and promoting togetherness and awareness amongst all children. [1] With Thanksgiving so close, we would like you to join us in taking a moment and thanking those who work tirelessly every day to improve the lives of our youngest children.

Whether that’s a parent, an early childhood educator, a doctor, child care provider, government leader, grandparent, volunteer, nurse, religious leader, an advocate for children, or a friend, we at Child Care Services Association (CCSA) thank you for your dedication and leadership to ensuring the mission that every child deserves access to affordable, high-quality child care and education.

What is high-quality early childhood education?

High-quality early childhood education is critical to a child’s development by creating a stimulating, safe and loving environment for children birth to 5. [2] “A high-quality program uses teaching approaches that support a child’s learning and curriculum goals. Teachers modify strategies to respond to the needs of individual children, and provide learning opportunities through both indoor and outdoor play.” [2]

“Quality programs are comprehensive.” [3] High-quality child birth-to-five programs have lasting boosts in cognition and socio-emotional skills driving better education, health, social and economic outcomes. [3] Research shows that “high-quality birth-to-five programs for disadvantaged children can deliver a 13% return on investment,” which means children are more likely to graduate high school, go to college, have a family and live a happier, more successful life. [3]

On Giving Tuesday (December 3), consider investing in our children—our future. At Child Care Services Association, we’re all about children. From helping children build healthy behaviors in what they eat and how they play to making sure their teachers are qualified, trained and adequately paid, CCSA focuses on a child’s early years, aiming to make them happy, stable and secure.

When all children have that start—a healthy foundation—we all do better.

Children are happier and more ready to enter school, parents are secure in knowing their child is being cared for and educated in a stable environment, and early childhood educators have the resources they need to continue their education and can support their families while pursuing the career they love.

At CCSA, we’re also all about making sure all children have that healthy foundation. To have that healthy foundation, all children need more stable relationships with better-educated and fairly compensated teachers that stay in their jobs.

In fact, research shows that early experiences are particularly important for the brain development of children of color and children from low-income families.

“The highest rate of return in early childhood development comes from investing as early as possible, from birth through age five, in disadvantaged families. The best investment is in quality early childhood development from birth to five for disadvantaged children and their families.” [4]

At CCSA, we use research, services and advocacy to build a healthy foundation for every child because we believe all children deserve the best start at their best life.

How can you invest in high-quality early childhood education?

Give to CCSA today! Your gift may help support a parent who is starting a new job through our referral and scholarship programs or a child care teacher who wants to finish an early childhood education degree through our scholarship and compensation programs.

Our work results in enormous benefits for children, families and the community. Help us make sure every child has a good start to lifelong learning in a safe, nurturing, quality environment.

Donate today!


[1] https://www.awarenessdays.com/awareness-days-calendar/universal-childrens-day-2019/

[2] https://www.collabforchildren.org/families/what-high-quality-child-care

[3] https://heckmanequation.org/www/assets/2017/04/F_Heckman_CBA_InfographicHandout_040417.pdf

[4] https://heckmanequation.org/resource/invest-in-early-childhood-development-reduce-deficits-strengthen-the-economy/

By Tomonica Rice-Yarborough and Kathy Thornton from CCSA’s Professional Development Initiatives Team

World Teacher’s Day was established in 1994 to recognize and celebrate teachers all over the world for their hard work and dedication. It also brings to light the issues affecting the profession to work toward a resolution for retaining and attracting teachers to the field. This day was founded to celebrate public school teachers, but early care educators also should be recognized on this day because they’re instrumental to the growth and development of our children. Their contributions to society’s economic stability should be valued, recognized and celebrated.

One of the main issues facing early care educators is the little recognition or validation they receive for the pivotal roles they play in the lives and development of young children. As a field, early educators in North Carolina often hold degrees, but they earn significantly less than public school teachers. According to CCSA’s 2015 North Carolina Child Care Workforce Study, the median wage of center directors in North Carolina was $16.00 per hour, while teachers earned $10.97 per hour and assistant teachers earned $9.97 per hour. 

Although degree attainment has drastically increased in North Carolina, the field as a whole still suffers from being perceived as a high priced “babysitting service.” For 30 years, the T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® Scholarship Program has provided the workforce with access to a debt-free college education while they work as low wage earners teaching future doctors, lawyers, teachers, administrative assistants, scientists…

Our brains grow faster between the ages of birth and 3 than any other time in our life. Children who are formally cared for in early education settings outside of their homes depend on the early educator to support their developmental growth. Those years are particularly formative, making the role of the early educator even more critical. According to philosopher John Locke, “a child’s mind is a blank slate waiting to be filled with knowledge.” Early educators play a big part in setting the foundation for our children’s future.

On Sept. 4, 2019, Australia celebrated Early Childhood Educators’ Day to honor and appreciate early childhood educators. The world, like Australia, should have a day set aside to recognize early childhood educators. Sadly, early childhood educators are seldom during the World Teacher’s Day observance. This lends credence to the perception that early childhood education isn’t seen as a worthy profession. Why can’t we dedicate a day of observance to them?

Early education workforce initiatives in North Carolina such as the T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® Scholarship Program, the Child Care WAGE$® and the Infant-Toddler Educator AWARD$ salary supplement programs and NAEYC’s Power to the Profession are aimed at professionalizing the early care and education field so its members receive the respect, recognition and compensation they so rightly deserve.

By Jennifer Gioia, CCSA Communications Manager

Joe Coffey

Joe Coffey will earn his Master’s in Education (M.Ed.) from UNC-Wilmington next spring, and because of the Teacher Education and Compensation Helps (T.E.A.C.H.) Early Childhood® Scholarship program, he will do so debt-free. T.E.A.C.H. provides educational scholarships to early care professionals and those who perform specialized functions in the early care system.

Joe has had the desire to teach and engage families and children for 18 years serving as a preschool teacher, kindergarten teacher, public school administrator and training and technical assistance specialist. Now, while he pursues his M.Ed., he is the Child Care Resource & Referral (CCR&R) Program Director for Onslow County Partnership for Children in North Carolina.

“I am a true believer in lifelong learning. I also feel it is our responsibility to model life-long learning for those that we serve,” Joe said. “I originally became familiar with the T.E.A.C.H. program when I was completing my associate’s degree. Fellow students shared the information with me.”

What is T.E.A.C.H.?

In 1990, Child Care Services Association (CCSA) created the T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® Scholarship program to address the issues of under-education, poor compensation and high turnover in the early childhood workforce. In 2000, the T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® National Center was established in response to the growth and expansion of the T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® Scholarship. The T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® National Center is now offered in 22 states plus D.C. and has awarded over 150,000 scholarships since its opening.

T.E.A.C.H. is an umbrella for a variety of scholarship programs for those working in early education in North Carolina. Because of the complexities of the different scholarships, each recipient is assigned a specific scholarship counselor.

T.E.A.C.H. Scholarship Counselors

Kimberly Bynum

Kimberly Bynum, who has been with CCSA for 22 years, is the program manager for T.E.A.C.H. North Carolina. One of her main duties is to provide counseling to graduate-level scholarship recipients like Joe. Those counselors are the reason Joe can say, “The process has been easy to use and to understand.”

“Joe is a great recipient to work with,” Kimberly said. “There’s not a lot of hand holding to do with him. He’s really proactive, but if there is ever anything missing, like when we do check-ins with our recipients several times throughout the semester, he’s very responsive to getting me what I need.”

Counselors play a vital role for T.E.A.C.H. scholarship recipients, helping them navigate through the many obstacles they may face while furthering their education.

“I do the same thing for Joe as I do for all my recipients. I make sure if they’re enrolled in school, we have the documents we need to go ahead and pay for their tuition upfront, because we don’t want anybody dropped…I usually go through and look at all my recipients, including Joe, to make sure we sent in the authorization to the colleges and universities,” said Kimberly.

And because of T.E.A.C.H., Joe will be able to graduate with his M.Ed. debt-free.

“T.E.A.C.H. has made it possible for me to continually build on my education from an Associate’s in Applied Science to a Master’s in Education without incurring a huge amount of student debt,” said Joe. “Early childhood education is a field in which the professionals are often underpaid and are themselves lacking resources. T.E.A.C.H. provides an avenue to advance education and careers while helping to avoid massive student debt.”

Kimberly finds her part in that process gratifying.

“What I really enjoy most about my position is…developing that one-on-one relationship [with the recipients],” she said. “It really just brings it all together when you’re at a conference or…attending graduations and you get to meet that person face-to-face…Especially at graduation, it makes you feel really proud, because you work with these people for so long, so they made it and they’re done.”

The Economic Impact of T.E.A.C.H.

Kimberly is also proud that T.E.A.C.H. has a wide reach that goes well beyond the scholarship recipient after graduation.

“We are empowering these scholarship recipients to [earn] more education, which in turn, they bring back into their facility, they’re better equipped to teach the children and then the children are ready for school when they start kindergarten.”

Once recipients complete their degree, they increase their marketability in the early childhood education system and may experience growth in their wages as well. In 2018, associate degree scholarship program recipients experienced an 11% increase in their earnings, with a low turnover rate of 8%.

“In addition, it’s increasing the star rating level as far as education goes for those facilities they’re employed in, making them more attractive to families, so increasing business that way,” Kimberly said. “Also, what [T.E.A.C.H.] does in the community…is increase the student enrollment in early childhood education departments [at participating universities and colleges]. So by T.E.A.C.H. sponsoring students at these universities and colleges, there is a positive economic impact on the North Carolina college system.”

To continue supporting the operations of Child Care Services Association and crucial programs such as T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood®️ Scholarship North Carolina, please consider donating today.

Stacey Graham

Stacey Graham always loved working with children and started out as a substitute in the public schools. A friend opened a family child care home and shared how much she loved it and how rewarding it was. Stacey decided to follow suit and hasn’t looked back. She has operated her own program since 2007 and from the outset she understood the importance of education. She started off with the North Carolina Early Childhood Credential, but knew that the basics were not enough to meet the needs of her children.

“Once I really started school, I said, ‘Wow, I didn’t know anything about working with children.’” Stacey continued, “You don’t know what to teach if you don’t go to school. You have to know what to look for in children to do the best by them.”

Stacey kept pursuing her coursework while she maintained her child care home, and eventually earned her Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education. According to Stacey, education has changed since she was young.

“There are a lot of expectations now for five year olds. They have to be able to do so many things. The more I learn, the more I can help them learn.”

She wants to prepare her children for the next level. She feels that the Child Care WAGE$® supplements help her do that, and she has received multiple increases in her awards due to her education gains.

“I love WAGE$. Most of my check goes back into my program for the children. It often supports a special outing and helps my single parents who cannot afford that extra money. It was definitely an encouragement to return to school. I appreciate WAGE$ and T.E.A.C.H. A lot of things wouldn’t have been possible without those two programs working together. They help providers get and do more. I hope both continue.”

Stacey has accomplished so much with her child care program and two-year degree, but she doesn’t want to stop. She’s taking a summer course toward her Bachelor’s Degree and in the fall, she plans to take a full course load and continue teaching.

When she reflects on what makes her proud, it isn’t just her education. She says that the children in her program don’t leave until they age out. “One mom brought her son here when he was six weeks old and he stayed until he went to school. Even at age 11, he still wants to come back and see me. He lives in Florida now and asks to spend the summer here!”

Learn more about Child Care WAGE$® Program here.

Learn more about Teacher Education and Compensation Helps (T.E.A.C.H.) Early Childhood® Scholarship Program here.

Marsha Basloe, President of Child Care Services Association

Homelessness is a reality for many families with young children in our country. In fact, infancy is the period of life when a person is at highest risk of living in a homeless shelter in the U.S. And families with younger parents are at higher risk of experiencing sheltered homelessness than families with relatively older parents. Adults between the ages of 18 and 30 in families with children were three times more likely to use shelter programs than adults over 30 who live with children (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2016 AHAR Part 2).

As president of Child Care Services Association (CCSA), I am committed to ensuring that all our young children have high quality early care and education experiences. CCSA works to ensure affordable, accessible, high quality child care for all families through research, services and advocacy. We provide free referral services to families seeking child care, financial assistance to families who cannot afford quality child care, technical assistance to child care businesses, and educational scholarships and salary supplements to child care professionals through the T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® and Child Care WAGE$® Projects.

More and more people understand that high quality early childhood care and learning prepares children to succeed in the classroom and in life. Yet, what may not be known is that the impact of homelessness on children, especially young children, is extremely challenging and may lead to changes in brain architecture that can interfere with learning, social-emotional development, self-regulation and cognitive skills. In today’s world, children should be healthy, alert and motivated to have a better chance of leading productive lives. Not every child, however, has that chance.

Last week, Chapin Hall released Missed Opportunities: Pregnant and Parenting Youth Experiencing Homelessness in America. This third Research-to-Impact brief by Chapin Hall presents findings related to the experiences of young people who are pregnant or parenting and don’t have a stable place to live. They learned that rates of pregnancy and parenthood are high among youth experiencing homelessness, and that many of the young parents are homeless with their children. For pregnant and parenting youth who are homeless, the difficulties of coping with pregnancy and parenthood are compounded by the trauma they have experienced and the ongoing stress of not having a safe or stable place to live with their children.

We know that experiences of homelessness in early childhood are associated with poor early development and educational well-being. These experiences during infancy and toddlerhood are associated with poor academic achievement and engagement in elementary school (Perlman & Fantuzzo, 2010). Additionally, experiences of homelessness are associated with social emotional delays among young children (Haskett, et. al, 2015) and poor classroom-based social skills in elementary school (Brumley, Fantuzzo, Perlman, & Zager, 2015). These findings underscore the importance of ensuring that young children and their young parents who are experiencing homelessness have access to support that is critical to improving the long-term educational outcomes of children nationwide.

Karen McKnight, director of our NC Head Start Collaboration Office, coordinated a statewide Trauma in Early Childhood Education Workgroup, and I feel fortunate to be part of this effort. Promoting early childhood development and buffering stress experienced by young children experiencing homelessness and their families will be part of this work. This group of professionals from Head Start, Smart Start, CCR&R, PCANC, NCAEYC, NCIMHA and others will be attending a two-day on-campus program, facilitated by Nonie Lesaux and Stephanie Jones, faculty directors of the Saul Zaentz Early Education Initiative at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The training is guided by the question: How can early education leaders support the design and implementation of strong early learning environments, particularly in settings serving children facing adversity?

I hope we can all work together to have an early childhood workforce to meet the social-emotional and mental health needs of all our young children and their families. May is Mental Health Awareness Month. How are you supporting this work?

See additional resources below.

For Child Care Services Association, quality child care means healthy, happy children. Children who start kindergarten ready to grow, learn and succeed. Children who become successful, healthy adults. On this Mother’s Day weekend, CCSA celebrates mothers and the other incredible women in our lives.

In NC, approximately 99 percent of child care teachers are women. That statistic is mirrored in early education centers across the U.S.; women make up a large percentage of our early childhood educators and have an invaluable impact on and connection to our young children. And that connection and stability brings advantages to young children through their school years and well into adulthood. For Sarah,* a middle-school teacher, the impact child care has had on her daughter, Helen,* is immeasurable. Here’s her Child Care Story:

“Helen has been in some form of child care since she was 6 months old–so for more than three and a half years now. When she was born, I was teaching middle school in Adelphi, Md., just outside Washington, D.C. My husband worked in D.C. for the federal government. Put simply, there was no way we could afford the cost of living in the D.C. metro area without both of our salaries, so I had to go back to work.

We ran into a lot of hurdles finding child care in D.C. There are child care centers there with years-long waiting lists; people get on the waiting list before they even get pregnant in some cases. My husband worked for a federal agency that had child care in the building, which would have been so ideal — except it had a long waiting list, and it was incredibly expensive (so expensive my salary would basically have covered the cost of that, and nothing more). Colleagues recommended a variety of places, but space and expense kept being issues. Finally a friend mentioned that a child had just left her son’s center, and things just fell into place. It was a licensed home-based child care center, and it was incredibly convenient to our house and my work. It was owned and run by a Colombian immigrant, and all of the employees were native Spanish speakers, so we had this unexpected blessing of giving Helen a language immersion experience from infancy.

Being in child care since she was a baby has been a great thing for Helen. She is a very social kid, and she loves the stimulation of being around other children (especially as an only child). She’s great at communicating and sharing and empathizing, and I fully credit her time in child care for those skills. Watching her this year in her preschool setting, I know she was much more prepared for that than some of the other children in her class who had never experienced school. Beyond that, child care has helped her be more independent from me and her dad. She doesn’t cry when we leave her with a babysitter and she feels confident to be with people besides us. And she’s learned a lot. She’s a smart kid who picks up everything she’s exposed to. Thanks to our great child care experiences, we have a 4-year-old who’s fluent in Spanish, an expert on butterfly metamorphosis, and quickly becoming a great little chef.

Child care has also helped Helen grow into a great kid. I’m biased, but I think she’s an extremely kind, thoughtful, intelligent, polite, and self-possessed child. I attribute the development of many of those qualities to her experiences at school. She also feels safe and loved at school, and as a parent, that’s exactly what I want for her.”

CCSA works to ensure that all children, regardless of their circumstances, have equal access to the same wonderful, supportive learning experience that Helen and her family have had. Through financial assistance for families that cannot afford quality care, free referral services to families seeking child care, technical assistance to child care businesses and educational scholarships and salary supplements to child care professionals through the TEACH Early Childhood® and Child Care WAGE$® programs, CCSA works with parents, teachers, and child care centers to put all our young children on a path toward health and happiness. Support that mission by giving to CCSA today.

*Names changed.

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